The Total Guide To Growing Buckets Full of Strawberries

who doesn’t love strawberries? there are “secrets” to being successful but the secrets are not difficult. click on the link to learn more!

https://www.naturallivingideas.com/the-total-guide-to-growing-strawberries/

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31 Long Forgotten Native Herbal Remedies

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my mother is native american and while she didn’t really have any special remedies, her mother did and i, as an adult have gone on and learned the old ways.  fascinating and some i have used my entire life.  even the way i garden is based on the indigenous peoples’  ways.  worth the read for sure. click the link and learn more. the photo is of a plains indian.  we are cherokee so this is not our head dress.  few people know there are many different head dresses and native wear. even the shoes are vastly different.  i will post more native articles in the future.  you should live and enjoy the life i live.  next i will be posting several tribes recipes for fry bread. YUMMY

31 long forgotten native herbal remedies

HOW TO GROW TURMERIC

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i’ve been growing turmeric for awhile.  it’s really pretty easy to grow and this link will tell you exactly what you need to do. mine grows under a japanese maple, in the shade with bright indirect light and gets watered when i think about it.  it’s very happy.  check out the link for all the info!

http://www.therainforestgarden.com/2011/12/how-to-grow-turmeric.html

ORGANIC DANDELION JELLY

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Organic Dandelion Jelly

 
A few years ago I got the canning bug something bad so I was trying all kinds of new recipes. I remembered hearing about dandelion jelly, so I scouted out a few recipes. I remember my Granny making jellies. Mainly apple jelly and grape jelly are the ones I remember most. I wouldn’t think that my Granny would pass up making dandelion jelly since they are free and in most every ones yards every spring. So I talked myself into trying to make jelly. I personally welcome this time of the year when they start popping up, because all I can see is the yummy goodness that will fill my jars and the smiles it puts on my children’s faces.
 
for the rest of this article, please click the link:

A Cat’s Cradle for Tomatoes An easy technique to train your tomatoes.

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Many years ago, I saw a farm worker trellising tomatoes in a commercial field. He quickly walked down one row and up the other side with his hand bobbing up and down like a needle on a sewing machine. In minutes, hundreds of tomato plants were secure in their trellis. This speedy technique, sometimes called Florida weave, holds tomato plants upright in slots created by twine strung horizontally between stakes.

Without a trellis or cage, tomato plants would sprawl on the ground, vulnerable to fungi and insects. One of the most common ways to trellis tomatoes in the home garden is also one of the most time consuming: tying a tomato plant to a stake. With one or two plants, that’s no big deal. But if you have a dozen or more tomatoes needing weekly attention as they grow, the Florida weave saves time.

Here’s how: Plant tomatoes in a straight row, spaced about 2 feet apart. Drive stakes at the beginning and end of the row and in the spaces between the plants. (In regions without a lot of wind, you can get by with a stake between every other plant.)

 

http://www.organicgardening.com/learn-and-grow/cat-s-cradle-tomatoes

HOW TO MAKE MOZARELLA CHEESE PART ONE

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Why Make Homemade Mozzarella?

So, why go to all the trouble of making mozzarella at home? Here are my top 4 reasons:

1. It taste sooo much better than the stuff at the store. The bargain-brand mozzarella you find at supermarkets pretty much tastes like cardboard to me… Of course, you can spring for a higher-quality brand, but expect to pay considerably more.

2. It’s (mostly) raw. Well, as raw as mozzarella can be, I guess. You won’t be heating the milk or curds past 100 degrees with this recipe. However, during the stretching process, you will be dipping the curds in hot liquid which effects the ‘rawness’ a bit. However, I’m thinkin’ it’s still way better than the mozzarella made with totally pasteurized skim milk at the grocery store. (Here’s why raw milk is important to me, in case you were wondering.)

3. It uses up lots of milk. If you have your own dairy animals, this is a really, really good thing. When I’m drowning in milk, I make a double batch of mozzarella, which uses up 4 gallons of milk.

4. It freezes well. Make a bunch of mozz when you’re swimming in milk and freeze it for the times when your animals are dry

for the entire article, please click the link:

http://www.theprairiehomestead.com/2013/05/how-to-make-mozzarella-cheese-part-one-getting-ready.html

CALENDULA SOAP

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Cleaning out the sewing room recently, I came across a good stash of homegrown calendula petals from last year that were dried and ready to go. Ah, yes, calendula soap. I had wanted to have a crack at this for quite some time and my memory had been jogged after chatting soap and calendula with a vegie groupie just last week. Calendula is well known for it’s skin soothing properties and as an added bonus, the petals actually keep their colour during the saponification process, when the lye and oils mix together to form ‘soap’. I just had to give it a go..

(**This is not a detailed tutorial for making soap. Certain safety precautions need to be observed when making soap at home which I haven’t covered here. See Rhonda’s cold pressed soap recipe if starting out with handmade soaps for the first time.**)

for the full article, please click the link:  

http://slowlivingessentials.blogspot.com/2011/10/calendula-soap.html

 

also, check out the other article entitled:HOW TO MAKE COLD PRESSED SOAP