Cold-Process All-Natural Handmade Soap

 

 

 

 

 

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Nourishing all-natural soap makes a wonderful gift for yourself and others.  Check out these recipes for Lemongrass Ginger Coffee Kitchen Soap, Rosemary Spearmint Energizing Shower Soap, and Orange Vanilla Cinnamon Soap.   With natural vegetable ingredients, pure essential oils, natural colours, and herbs from the garden, you can feel good about taking care of those who use your handmade soap.

FOR ALL THE INSTRUCTIONS, PLEASE CLICK THIS LINK

http://gardentherapy.ca/handmadesoap/

THE GREAT BUCKET EXPERIMENT

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Do windows in buckets = a good idea? Maybe.

This way I hope I’ll see what’s going on inside my buckets!

So here’s how this bucket experiment goes:

3 buckets. One has a base of sticks. The second has a log base and the last “control” bucket contains no wood at all.

All three buckets have some home made compost mixed with a readily available commercial potting mix (Miracle Grow).

All three buckets contain one red bell pepper and two lettuce plants.

What I’m looking for:

I want to see if one bucket performs better than another and if so, which one.

 

http://thegreatbucketexperiment.org/peek-a-bucket-garden/

5 EASY STEPS FOR FAST COMPOST Get garden-ready compost in about 30 days.

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http://www.organicgardening.com/learn-and-grow/5-easy-steps-fast-compost

Making compost is probably the single most important thing you can do for your organic garden. The success of your garden depends on the soil, and the health of your soil depends on the compost you give it. And making compost isn’t difficult. With very little effort on your part, you can turn throw-away materials into this sweet-smelling, nutrient-rich, no-cost soil conditioner. So how do you start this easy composting?

 

Self Reliant Living and 40 Ways to Self Sufficiency

Self Reliant Living and 40 Ways to Self Sufficiency

Here we show you 40 ways to self reliant living and self sufficiency whether you live in the city or the suburbs. Urban homesteading and urban self sufficiency is a lifestyle sought out by the baby boomers, and for good reason! So many people think that having a large piece of land allows them to be self sufficient. As I have always said, it is not the size that counts, but what you do with it! 😉

 

Self Reliant Living and 40 Ways to Self Sufficiency.

DIY Raised Bed for gardening

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For this project, you will need two 8 foot 2×12 planks (cut in half), 4 corner brackets, screws, weed preventing landscape cloth, scrap cardboard, veggie scraps, green leaves, green grass clipping or other green matter, leaves, twigs, dried hay/grass or other brown material, organic soil.

NOTE:(we made our raised bed 3×6 to fit our space. you can make yours whatever size you wish. 4×4 is easier to work without the need for stepping in the soil. and we used brackets we had on hand.  choose whatever works best for you.)

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Using your electric screwdriver,  mount the corner bracket in the center of your board. Make sure it is straight and flush.

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Attach the remaining board via the bracket, forming a corner.Image

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It’s easier to do this if you have someone help you hold the board against the bracket, while you use the electric screw driver to screw it together.

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You now have your raised bed frame.

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Cut weed preventing landscape cloth a few inches bigger than the inside of the box/bed.  You will need this extra cloth to staple to the wood.

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Next, add cardboard you have saved for this project.  It’s biodegradable and will work as a moisture barrier.  Cardboard is considered “brown” material and works with your raised bed to provide nutrients like dried leaves would.  Don’t skip this step.

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Keep filling your bed until the cardboard is as even as you can get it. Make sure it’s flat as possible.  You can add several layers.

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Add green material on top of the cardboard.  Green material is anything like veggie scraps, fruit peelings, green leaves, small amount of grass clippings, eggshells, coffee grounds.

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We added banana leaves from a tree we pruned and other leaves and small twigs from pruning trees and shrubs. Don’t use large twigs or sticks.

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Cover the cardboard as well as possible with your green matter.  You are building a “compost” under your soil which will feed your plants for months and help maintain moisture in your soil.

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Next add brown material: dried leaves, some dried grass, dried tomato vines, dried corn husks, small twigs. (if you don’t have dried leaves, you can use strips of newspaper or other scrap paper)

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Break up any twigs or vines into small pieces.  We walk on ours to crunch it up and press it down before we add the soil.

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Add organic soil on top of your other layers and smooth it as evenly as possible.  You will have to add more soil, in time, as the levels compress and compost.

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Now your raised bed is ready for planting!  If you’d like to make the most of your space, make a grid from twine, mapping off 16 squares, each one being 1 square foot.  Plant your veggies in each square. You can read about square foot gardening online or look for future posts about it, here.

How to Build Your Own Outdoor Mud Oven | Wake Up World

Rocket stoves and outdoor grills are great for cooking in a pot or skillet when the power is down or non-existent following a disaster or a worst case SHTF situation where fuel is either flat-out unavailable or intolerably expensive.

There are some things, though, that cook best in an oven. One solution, of course, is to use a cast iron Dutch oven or camp stove. These are great options, sure, but what about something made from the ground we stand on? I am referring to what is commonly caused a “Mud Oven”. Until my recent visit to the Mother Earth News Fair in Puyallup, Washington, I did not know such a thing existed. Live and learn, right?

Mud-Fire-Over

How to Build Your Own Outdoor Mud Oven | Wake Up World.

Canning Homemade!: Pressure Canning Safely

 

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Pressure Canning Safely

 

Pressure canning is the only method recommended safe by the U.S.D.A. for low-acid foods such as vegetables, meats and fish.
No matter how high you turn up the heat, boiling water cannot surpass 212 degrees F (even lower at high altitudes). A Pressure Canner brings jar temperatures up to 240-250 degrees F at just 15 lbs sq. in. This temperature can be reached only by creating steam under pressure.
  • 100% bacteria kill guaranteed!
  • Simple and safe to use
Note: Glass-top ranges are not designed for the high heat of canning.

Canning Homemade!: Pressure Canning Safely.