CALENDULA SOAP

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Cleaning out the sewing room recently, I came across a good stash of homegrown calendula petals from last year that were dried and ready to go. Ah, yes, calendula soap. I had wanted to have a crack at this for quite some time and my memory had been jogged after chatting soap and calendula with a vegie groupie just last week. Calendula is well known for it’s skin soothing properties and as an added bonus, the petals actually keep their colour during the saponification process, when the lye and oils mix together to form ‘soap’. I just had to give it a go..

(**This is not a detailed tutorial for making soap. Certain safety precautions need to be observed when making soap at home which I haven’t covered here. See Rhonda’s cold pressed soap recipe if starting out with handmade soaps for the first time.**)

for the full article, please click the link:  

http://slowlivingessentials.blogspot.com/2011/10/calendula-soap.html

 

also, check out the other article entitled:HOW TO MAKE COLD PRESSED SOAP

HOW TO MAKE HOMEMADE YEAST

 

 

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When I first started prepping, one of the first things I started to store were buckets of wheat given that they are relatively cheap and have a shelf life of 30+ years.

Overall it’s a fantastic storage food – especially if you like baking bread like I do.

The only problem that I found though was with yeast.

Although you can store your wheat for 30+ years, yeast’s shelf life will only last about a year before it starts to die off and become ineffective. And unless you enjoy eating unleavened Matzah bread, you’ll be forced to eat a lot of bread bricks during a SHTF situation.

This realization led me on a journey to find out how to make homemade yeast. For years I had looked around but could never figure it out until I stumbled upon an awesome blog called originalyeast.blogspot.com. In it, the author (I believe her name is Wao) learned how to make natural yeast while over in Japan.

These last couple of weeks I’ve been playing around with making natural yeast and have had some great success which I hope to share with you.

 

In this article, I go into detail on how you can make your own homemade yeast using common foods found in your home or in the wild.

 

 

http://www.tacticalintelligence.net/blog/how-to-make-homemade-yeast.htm

Cold-Process All-Natural Handmade Soap

 

 

 

 

 

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Nourishing all-natural soap makes a wonderful gift for yourself and others.  Check out these recipes for Lemongrass Ginger Coffee Kitchen Soap, Rosemary Spearmint Energizing Shower Soap, and Orange Vanilla Cinnamon Soap.   With natural vegetable ingredients, pure essential oils, natural colours, and herbs from the garden, you can feel good about taking care of those who use your handmade soap.

FOR ALL THE INSTRUCTIONS, PLEASE CLICK THIS LINK

http://gardentherapy.ca/handmadesoap/

5 EASY STEPS FOR FAST COMPOST Get garden-ready compost in about 30 days.

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http://www.organicgardening.com/learn-and-grow/5-easy-steps-fast-compost

Making compost is probably the single most important thing you can do for your organic garden. The success of your garden depends on the soil, and the health of your soil depends on the compost you give it. And making compost isn’t difficult. With very little effort on your part, you can turn throw-away materials into this sweet-smelling, nutrient-rich, no-cost soil conditioner. So how do you start this easy composting?

 

Self Reliant Living and 40 Ways to Self Sufficiency

Self Reliant Living and 40 Ways to Self Sufficiency

Here we show you 40 ways to self reliant living and self sufficiency whether you live in the city or the suburbs. Urban homesteading and urban self sufficiency is a lifestyle sought out by the baby boomers, and for good reason! So many people think that having a large piece of land allows them to be self sufficient. As I have always said, it is not the size that counts, but what you do with it! 😉

 

Self Reliant Living and 40 Ways to Self Sufficiency.

How to Make Super-Sturdy Tomato Cages: Organic Gardening

At the Organic Gardening Test Garden, tomato plants grow in heavy-duty wire cages we’ve used for years. These square, vertical columns keep our tomatoes standing tall, even when wind whips through the farm. We expect to get a few more decades of use out of our tomato cages—they’re that durable.

What’s the secret of their strength and longevity? Our cages are constructed from livestock panels—rigid, 16-foot-long fence sections, made of heavy-gauge galvanized wire and sold at farm-supply stores. The panels are designed with different sizes of openings for various types of farm animals. For this project, we chose cattle panels that are 50 inches tall with openings 8 inches by 6 inches. Panels with wider-spaced wires cost less and are easier to work with, and it’s easier to pick ripe tomatoes through the larger openings.

tomato cages

tomato cages

How to Make Super-Sturdy Tomato Cages: Organic Gardening.

How to Build Your Own Outdoor Mud Oven | Wake Up World

Rocket stoves and outdoor grills are great for cooking in a pot or skillet when the power is down or non-existent following a disaster or a worst case SHTF situation where fuel is either flat-out unavailable or intolerably expensive.

There are some things, though, that cook best in an oven. One solution, of course, is to use a cast iron Dutch oven or camp stove. These are great options, sure, but what about something made from the ground we stand on? I am referring to what is commonly caused a “Mud Oven”. Until my recent visit to the Mother Earth News Fair in Puyallup, Washington, I did not know such a thing existed. Live and learn, right?

Mud-Fire-Over

How to Build Your Own Outdoor Mud Oven | Wake Up World.