HOW TO GROW TURMERIC

turmeric

i’ve been growing turmeric for awhile.  it’s really pretty easy to grow and this link will tell you exactly what you need to do. mine grows under a japanese maple, in the shade with bright indirect light and gets watered when i think about it.  it’s very happy.  check out the link for all the info!

http://www.therainforestgarden.com/2011/12/how-to-grow-turmeric.html

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Organic Gardens Help Fight Global Warming

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Not only do you get lovely tomatoes,fresh greens and berries….

Your backyard organic garden may hold the keys to preventing climate change.

Researchers at the Rodale Institute have learned that organic soils trap atmospheric carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas, and convert it to carbon, a key component of healthy soil.

In the longest-running study of its kind, the Rodale Institute’s Farming Systems Trial (FST) has compared organic and conventional farming side by side for the past 23 years. Important findings have included organic crops’ ability to withstand drought-year stress much better than crops raised on a diet of chemicals.

http://www.organicgardening.com/living/organic-gardens-help-fight-global-warming

HOW TO GROW A VEGETABLE GARDEN IN THE SHADE

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so you have a crummy, shady area where the lawn isn’t doing it for you but just don’t know what to do with it?  MAKE A SHADE GARDEN!!! there is a popular belief that you cannot garden without full sunlight.  wrong!  read the article at the link and learn.  i’m doing this, myself.

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http://shawnacoronado.com/2011/10/how-to-grow-a-vegetable-garden-in-shade-the-story-of-a-french-potager-kitchen-garden-gone-shade/

THE BEST SEED TAPE EVER!

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Best Seed Tape Ever

Planting tiny seeds is easy with this simple gardening trick.

 

best seed tape ever: toilet paper

It’s difficult to space tiny seeds, such as carrots, in the garden. The best way to solve this problem is to make homemade seed tape. Here’s how to do it:

1. Unroll a strip of toilet paper on a table (double ply works best), mist it with a sprayer, and place the seeds along the center of the strip. Be sure to space the seeds based on the seed packet’s recommendation. Tip: Alternate carrot seeds with radish seeds because when the radishes sprout, they help to mark the row and break the ground.

2. Starting along the strip’s long edge, fold a third of the paper over the seeds, then fold the other third over to cover the seeds completely. Lightly tamp the paper, misting it again to secure the seeds. Make as many of these strips as you need. Then carefully carry them to the garden.

3. Make shallow furrows in the prepared soil, lay the strips down, and cover them. In a jiffy, your small seeds will be planted and perfectly spaced.

http://www.organicgardening.com/learn-and-grow/best-seed-tape-ever?cm_mmc=OGNews-_-925872-_-05302012-_-best_seed_tape_ever_image

THE STORAGE LIFE OF SEEDS

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I spent part of today talking to a retire Professor from the California University system.  His expertise is in plants, particularly tomato plants.  The subject we discussed was the long-term storage of plant seeds.  Based on his many years of experience he said that the best method is to store seeds in a paper sack in the refrigerator.  In his opinion, the preferred temperature to store seeds is 50 degrees.  For practical purposes, a refrigerator works well.  He recommended against freezing your seeds.  High heat will also shorten the storage life of seeds.

He has germinated tomatoes seeds that were 50 years old that had been stored correctly.  On one occasion, he received wheat seeds (wheat berries) from a cave in South America that were several hundred years old and they germinated.

If seeds fail to germinate, he said it is often because the seed coat has become hard.  He said that you can soften the seed coat by soaking in them in a mixture of two parts water to one part chlorox for thirty minutes.  Then rinse them in clean water and plant.  This will not always work but is well worth a try.  He told me the story of another Professor who had some tomato seeds that would not germinate so they were fed to his turtle.  After going through the digestive track of his turtle, the seeds were then discovered to germinate.

The length of storage life varies from plant to plant.  However, most plants seeds should last a few years.  Legumes have a short shelf life compared to tomatoes.

The following is additional information that comes from the University of Colorado.

for the rest of the article, please click this link:

http://preparednessadvice.com/gardening/the-storage-life-of-seeds/#.UaXxHEDVDE1